NEWS CENTER

US Scientists: Cement Can be Converted into Semiconductors for iPad and Other Products


Release time:

May 31,2013

Scientists at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois and the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Japan say they have developed a new way to turn cement into liquid metal semiconductors. They can turn the building material into a semiconductor and make it into computer chips and even screens and protective coatings. Chris Bammer (ChrisBenmore), a physicist at the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, said: "This new material has many uses. It can be used to make resistors in liquid crystal demonstrators and tablet computer displays that users are using." Turning cement into liquid metal requires

Scientists at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois and the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Japan say they have developed a new way to turn cement into liquid metal semiconductors. They can turn the building material into a semiconductor and make it into computer chips and even screens and protective coatings.

Chris Benmore, a physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, said: "This new material has many uses. It can be used to make resistors in liquid crystal demonstrations and tablet computer displays that users are using."

Turning cement into liquid metal requires a pneumatic suspension device, which uses air pressure to keep the material from touching any container surface, and a carbon dioxide laser beam to heat the material to 3632 degrees Fahrenheit. The material the scientists used was a material called mayenite, which is a calcium-aluminum oxide that is part of the high-alumina cement material. The material is placed in a pneumatic suspension device, heated to melt, and finally cooled to a glassy state. This manufacturing method can capture electrons and allow conduction, and can effectively convert cement into semiconductors like metals.

It is understood that compared with traditional metals, the new material has better corrosion resistance, is also slightly weaker than traditional glass, and has lower energy loss in a magnetic field, has electrical conductivity and fluidity, and is easily processed or molded into other products.

Scientists say the new building material can achieve "electronic trapping". Banmer said: "This phenomenon of trapping electrons and converting liquid cement into liquid metal was only recently discovered, but the details of it cannot be explained until now. Now that we know that the conditions needed to be created in the new material to trap electrons, we can develop and test other materials to see if they can conduct electricity in the same way."