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Hong Kong reproduces cement piles to prevent street sleepers after Guangdong cement cone


Release time:

Jul 24,2013

From Guangzhou, Hong Kong, laying cement cones under overpasses, making it impossible for street sleepers to settle under overpasses. In Hong Kong, there are also a group of street sleepers living on the streets for various reasons under the bright neon lights of the noisy city. Seventeen of them have been sleeping under the flyover on the West Kowloon Corridor at Yau Ma Tei Ferry Street for many years. In February last year, due to a greening project by the Yau Tsim Mong District Council, 2.53 million yuan (Hong Kong dollars, the same below) was spent on the bottom of the flyover with an iron net and 200 cement flower troughs were placed. Members intervened under the Hong Kong government's untimely clearance of the overpass, with pebbles, high and low stone piles, and undulating ground. "These are all designed to prevent

From Guangzhou, Hong Kong, laying cement cones under overpasses, making it impossible for street sleepers to settle under overpasses. In Hong Kong, there are also a group of street sleepers living on the streets for various reasons under the bright neon lights of the noisy city. Seventeen of them have been sleeping under the flyover on the West Kowloon Corridor at Yau Ma Tei Ferry Street for many years. In February last year, due to a greening project by the Yau Tsim Mong District Council, 2.53 million yuan (Hong Kong dollars, the same below) was spent on the bottom of the flyover with an iron net and 200 cement flower troughs were placed.

Members intervened in the Hong Kong Government without immediate clearance.

Under the overpass, cobblestones, stone piles of different heights, and undulating ground, "these are designed to prevent street sleepers from settling down." Wu Weidong, director of the Hong Kong Association of Community Organizations, said that similar designs can be seen everywhere at the bottom of the flyover along the West Kowloon Corridor. Now the space under the overpass has been enclosed by barbed wire, and there are still more than a dozen street sleepers who should have moved out before the May 7 deadline. The intervention of members of the Legislative Council has not immediately cleared the Hong Kong government, but there is not much time left for street sleepers.

"The government closed the bottom of this overpass two years ago, and the travelers who used to sleep there have been forced to move to the opposite bottom of the bridge." Wu Weidong, director of the Hong Kong Association of Community Organizations, has been concerned about the survival of street sleepers in Hong Kong. However, in February last year, the Yau Tsim Mong District Council, to which the flyover belongs, passed a greening project to seal the bottom of the flyover near Junfa Garden with barbed wire. Street sleepers who moved from the side of Bi Street once again faced the plight of nowhere to live.

There is no hope of keeping the space at the bottom of the overpass.

Under the overpass, the ground is divided into several areas, each with different designs. Part of the ground is erected with cylindrical stone piles of different heights; part of the ground is inlaid with densely packed pebbles, and the stones are straight up; more ground is designed as slopes of different heights, making it impossible for street sleepers to sleep. Wu Weidong said that in addition to the West Kowloon Corridor, the same design is also available at the bottom of the flyover in Kowloon City.

"We have asked many government departments, and each has its own answer: beautification and decoration, drainage, and prevention of traffic accidents, but we just refuse to admit that it is to prohibit street sleepers." Director-General of the Hong Kong Community Development Network, Long Weiwen, said earlier.

"In June, the Legislative Council's Welfare Affairs Committee held a meeting, and a group of street sleepers expressed their views on the greening project in the parliament. In July, the congressmen came to the scene of the Ferry Street Flyover to see it, and it was considered that they were involved in the event. Otherwise, the venue would be cleared on May 7." But Wu Weidong doesn't have much hope of preserving the space under this overpass for street sleepers.

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Provide deposit to assist upstairs

Yesterday's legislation continued to raise questions on the issue of the impact of the Ferry Street Flyover greening project on street sleepers. On June 10, the Welfare Services Committee of the Legislative Council listened to the opinions of street sleepers. In the end, the Welfare Committee unanimously approved the Hong Kong Government's practice of closing the bottom of the bridge to drive away street sleepers.

Yau Tsim Mong District Officer Ho Xiaoping also revealed that although some street sleepers have CSSA payments, they still have to pay a two-month deposit for renting houses. For this reason, the Social Welfare Department has specially granted subsidies to pay the deposit first to facilitate street sleepers to go upstairs as soon as possible.